EXTERNAL-COMBUSTION ENGINES--RANKINE AND STIRLING ENGINES AS SMALL-SCALE POWER SOURCES FOR DEVELOPING COUNTRIES. APPENDIX 4

The Stirling- and the Rankine-cycle engines (based on modifications of the Carnot cycle) are adaptable to a variety of heat sources, and for temperatures below 300-350 deg C, the Rankine is more efficient. The Rankine system and its operation is described, and the efficiency of its major components (engine efficiency, annual collector efficiency, and system efficiency) are described. Comparisons with other cycles are also made. Different forms of Stirling engines are described, including free-piston Stirling engines, diaphragm engine, and the fluidyne engine. The status of current technology and the need for further research and development are noted. There is little likelihood that Stirling engines will be used in developing countries to any great extent in the next five years. If development of the present prototypes in industrialized countries results in manufacturing economies, applications in developing countries may be possible in 5-10 years.

  • Supplemental Notes:
    • From "Energy for Rural Devlopment. Renewable Resources and Alternative Technologies for Developing Countries," Report of an Ad Hoc Panel of the Advisory Committee on Technology Innovation, Board on Science and Technology for International Development. Copies available in French from the Office of Energy, Bureau for Development Support, Agency for International Development, Washington, D.C. 20523.
  • Corporate Authors:

    National Academy of Sciences-Natl Research Council

    BART Impact Program Advisory Committee
    Washington, DC  USA  20418
  • Publication Date: 1976

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; References;
  • Pagination: p. 246-269

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00322750
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Apr 15 1981 12:00AM