Gas-phase and semivolatile organic emissions from a modern nonroad diesel engine equipped with advanced aftertreatment

U.S. Tier 4 Final and Euro Stage IV and V regulations for nonroad compression-ignition engines have led to the development of exhaust aftertreatment technologies optimized for nonroad engines and duty cycles. In this study, several aftertreatment configurations consisting of state-of-the-art diesel oxidation catalysts (DOCs), diesel particulate filters (DPFs), copper (Cu) zeolite– and vanadium-based selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts, and ammonia oxidation (AMOX) catalysts are evaluated using both nonroad transient (NRTC) and steady (8-mode NRSC) cycles in order to understand both component- and system-level effects of diesel aftertreatment on gas-phase, semivolatile, and particle-phase and particle-bound unregulated organic emissions. Organic emissions reported in this work include total hydrocarbon (THC), n-alkanes, branched alkanes, saturated cycloalkanes, aromatics, aldehydes, ketones, hopanes, steranes, and soluble organic fraction (SOF). Brake-specific emissions are reported for four configurations, including engine-out, DOC+CuZ-SCR+AMOX, V-SCR+AMOX, and DOC+DPF+CuZ-SCR+AMOX, and conversion of engine-out emissions is reported for the three aftertreatment configurations. Mechanisms responsible for the reduction of organic species are discussed in detail. This summary of emissions from a current nonroad diesel engine equipped with advanced aftertreatment can be used to more accurately model the impact of anthropogenic emissions on the atmosphere with tools such as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Motor Vehicle Emissions Simulator (MOVES2014a) model. Implications: Anthropogenic emissions are a source of significant human health and environmental risk. This study, focused on the treatment of exhaust emissions from a modern nonroad diesel engine with a variety of aftertreatment configurations, examines the impact that human industrial activity can have on air pollution. In particular, we focus on the remediation of gas-phase and semivolatile organic emissions by emission reduction technologies. This detailed summary of emissions from a current nonroad diesel engine equipped with advanced aftertreatment can be used to more accurately model the impact of anthropogenic emissions on the atmosphere with tools such as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s MOVES2014a model.

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  • English

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  • Accession Number: 01699483
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Jan 16 2019 3:01PM