Daily Feelings of US Workers and Commuting Time

Millions of individuals commute every day in the US. Despite commuting has been shown to have negative consequences for workers, no evidence has been about how commuting is related to feelings in other episodes. The authors analyzed the relationship between the feelings reported by American workers throughout the day and the time devoted to commuting. The authors used the Well-Being Module of the American Time Use Survey for the years 2010, 2012, and 2013, and analyzed the relationship between commuting duration and the feelings reported (e.g, happiness, sadness, stress, fatigue and pain) in both commuting and non-commuting episodes. The authors found that more time spent on the daily commute was related to higher levels of fatigue and stress during commuting, while also being associated with higher levels of sadness and fatigue during activities of child care. In particular, the authors found that a 1% increase in the time devoted to commuting during the episode was related to increases of 12 percent and 13 percent of a standard deviation for stress and fatigue, while a 1% increase in the time devoted to commuting during the day was related to increases of 5 percent and 7 percent of one standard deviation in the levels of sadness and fatigue during child care activities. The results indicated that longer commutes may be related to higher levels of stress and fatigue of workers, which may in turn affect the quality of the time parents devote to caring for their children.

Language

  • English

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Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 01687721
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Nov 30 2018 3:05PM