Study on Effectiveness of Anti-Icing and Deicing Performance of Super-Hydrophobic Asphalt Concrete

Super-hydrophobic asphalt concrete specimens were collaboratively designed and prepared by using modified hydrophobic materials and nano-materials. The anti-icing and deicing performance of super-hydrophobic asphalt concrete at different working conditions was compared to the traditional asphalt concrete through the combination of simulation test and theoretical analysis. The ice-repellency of super-hydrophobic asphalt concrete was characterized by means of contact angle and surface energy. It was found that the super-hydrophobic asphalt concrete could effectively promote the water drop rolling from its surface, and the rolling rate could reach 80%. Compared to that of the traditional asphalt concrete, super-hydrophobic asphalt concrete could significantly reduce the adhesion forces between ice and road. The observed effect of super-hydrophobic asphalt concrete was a delay of frost formation and evolution. It was indicated that the residual rate of ice on super-hydrophobic asphalt concrete was about 21.6% and 48.6% of those on traditional asphalt concrete respectively when freezing snow and freezing rain conditions came. It was proved that super-hydrophobic material had better durability by abrasion test. Theoretical results showed that the surface energy on the surface of super-hydrophobic specimens was about 5% of this on traditional asphalt concrete. It was proved that the skid resistance performance of super-hydrophobic asphalt concrete could conform to the requirements of the specification and the economic benefit of super-hydrophobic asphalt pavement material is considerable in the long run. The findings demonstrated the potential of using super-hydrophobic asphalt concrete on highways in adverse weather to provide better anti-icing and deicing performance and contribute to traffic safety in winter.

Language

  • English

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  • Accession Number: 01686759
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Oct 10 2018 3:14PM