Blast Analysis of Aging Transportation Structures with Little Stand-Off Distance

Due to the public exposure of transportation facilities, protection of major transportation structural members against terrorist attacks is considered a top priority by government agencies. Most of old urban transportation structures in the United States were made from custom steel shapes, which were built up from angles and flat plates using rivets. The built-up steel shapes resemble typical modern wide flange shapes. Since current approaches to designing structures subjected to blast loading have been developed mostly for military facilities, a significant stand-off distance is assumed. However, such a distance cannot nearly be maintained for urban transportation facilities, due to congested nature of an urban environment. The purpose of this study is to analyze aging transportation structures subjected to close-in detonations. Nonlinear explicit finite element analyses are performed for built-up steel shapes as well as standard wide flange shapes, fully coupled in real-time with blast effects based on computational fluid dynamics, using Ansys/Autodyn software. Numerous computer models are built to cover various sizes and blast conditions. Based on the blast analysis results, the ultimate objective is to develop a novel simplified approach or chart that can be used for the analysis and protection of the transportation structures. Five parameters of Johnson and Cook material model are adjusted for structural steel, addressing strain rate and temperature change effects during detonations. The results are compared to the behavior of standard wide flange shapes subjected to similar conditions.

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Media Type: Web
  • Features: Figures; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: 9p
  • Monograph Title: Congress on Technical Advancement 2017: Infrastructure Resilience and Energy

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 01683654
  • Record Type: Publication
  • ISBN: 9780784481028
  • Files: TRIS, ASCE
  • Created Date: Oct 4 2018 4:36PM