AUTOMOBILE FUEL ECONOMY AND THE DRIVER

The results of a study of the effect of driver characteristics and behavior on automobile fuel consumption and methods for improving driver fuel economy are presented. The fuel economy of 74 drivers was recorded for each of 10 trips over a 5.6-km (3.5-mile) urban test route on which there were 14 stops and 21 turns. Deceleration and acceleration rates as well as engine vacuum and tachometer readings were recorded for each trip. Driver fuel economy was related to the age and sex of drivers, maximum deceleration and acceleration rates, minimum engine vacuum, and maximum engine speed during accelerations. It was found that driver fuel economy is not related to the driver's age or sex and is about the same whether or not the driver makes full stops at all intersection stop signs. Correlation between driver fuel economy and minimum engine vacuum and maximum engine speeds during acceleration was fairly good. Correlation was poor between fuel economy and maximum rates of deceleration and acceleration. The study findings include an assessment of the usefulness of the vacuum gauge in assisting drivers to conserve fuel. The data indicate that many drivers would use more fuel with the vacuum gauge than without it. (Author)

Media Info

  • Media Type: Print
  • Features: Figures; References;
  • Pagination: pp 21-26
  • Monograph Title: DRIVER PERFORMANCE, PASSENGER SAFETY DEVICES, AND THE BICYCLIST
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00315354
  • Record Type: Publication
  • ISBN: 0309029953
  • Report/Paper Numbers: HS-029 543
  • Files: HSL, TRIS, TRB
  • Created Date: Sep 16 1984 12:00AM