INSTITUTIONAL FACTORS IN THE IMPLEMENTATION OF AUTOMOBILE-RESTRICTIVE MEASURES. PART 1: IMPLEMENTATION EXPERIENCE WITH TRANSPORTATION AIR QUALITY MEASURES IN THE DENVER, COLORADO, URBAN AREA

In recent years, Denver's high altitude, topography, rapid growth, and heavy reliance on the automobile have combined to cause a severe air pollution problem. According to the Colorado Air Pollution Control Commission, the principal cause of the pollution is the use of motor vehicles. The Denver region developed an air quality plan that was submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as part of the state implementation plan for air quality. The Denver element of the plan relies on strategies that reduce emissions at the tailpipe rather than strategies to restrict automobile use. Several institutional and attitudinal factors played a role in determining that automobile-restriction measures were not acceptable: (a) the no-problem syndrome, (b) the no-solution syndrome, (c) lack of public acceptance, (d) possibility of unequal burdens, (e) changing economic impact, (f) agency priorities, and (g) difficulty in resolving conflicts. As the Denver region moves from planning to implementation of air quality strategies, it will be important for the state to transcend parochial political interests and take the difficult stands necessary. The state must also be careful not to make decisions in a vacuum. Ascertaining the public's opinion on air quality strategies will be critical to their successful planning and implementation. (Author)

Media Info

  • Media Type: Print
  • Features: References;
  • Pagination: pp 54-57
  • Monograph Title: EVALUATING TRANSPORTATION PROPOSALS
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00312466
  • Record Type: Publication
  • ISBN: 0309029864
  • Report/Paper Numbers: HS-028 849
  • Files: HSL, TRIS, TRB
  • Created Date: Oct 27 1985 12:00AM