TRANSPORTATION AND TRANSIT PLANNING FOR SMALL AND MEDIUM-SIZED URBAN AREAS

Many of the factors that affect the planning of smaller transit systems also affect the successful operation of those systems. For example, the availability of qualified personnel in the area will affect both planning and management--there is often very litte real expertise readily accessible to smaller cities. In terms of funding, operating aid to cities has only recently been appropriated, and smaller local governments are usually quite ignorant as to what funds are actually available. Tradition plays an important part in that transit historically has been considered a private enterprise operated for profit. It is difficult for the public, and public officials, to consider transit as a service in the sense that libraries, police, and fire protection are services. Yet unlike most other municipal services, mass transportation has a direct competitor, the private automobile. Also unlike libraries or fire protection, public transit requires levying a charge each time it us used. Skillful management and marketing is particularly necessary in smaller urban areas to overcome public misgivings. Although the planning and provision of highways in these areas are apt to be handled quite effectively, transit is in many instances still handled badly. And this will continue until local planning and management can be upgraded and stronger local support can be developed. (Author)

Media Info

  • Media Type: Print
  • Pagination: pp 18-21
  • Monograph Title: TRANSPORTATION PLANNING FOR SMALL AND MEDIUM-SIZED COMMUNITIES. PROCEEDINGS OF A WORKSHOP
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00311208
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS, TRB, ATRI
  • Created Date: Jul 22 1981 12:00AM