Under the Ice: Protecting and managing untouched stocks in the central Arctic Ocean

Due to warming temperatures and natural variability, seasonal fluctuations in the high seas portion of the central Arctic Ocean are changing. The melting season has lengthened and winter ice recoveries have been weak. With less ice blocking potential marine transit routes, there will likely be an increase in human activity in the Arctic. While there are currently no commercial fisheries in the high seas portion of the central Arctic Ocean, future changes in fish stock migration and advances in technology could motivate fishermen to venture into the northern reaches of the Arctic in search of plentiful fishing grounds. Since July 2015, the five coastal states surrounding the Arctic Ocean—Canada, Norway, Russia, Denmark in respect of Greenland, and the United States—have been part of a non-legally binding moratorium on fishing in the high seas portion of the central Arctic Ocean. In addition, a joint program of scientific research was established. By making the moratorium binding, continuing extensive scientific research, and—the final step—creating an ecosystem-based management strategy, the high seas portion of the central Arctic Ocean could become a sustainable source of protein for a hungry world.

Language

  • English

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Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 01679213
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Aug 4 2018 10:08AM