ON THE USE OF HIGH SPEED PHOTOGRAPHY IN THE STUDY OF PROPELLER CAVITATION

Two experiments were conducted, using high-speed photography in an attempt to make direct measurements of cavity size. A five-bladed, gold-anodized propeller in a fixed wake was photographed at square root of N values of 2.05, 2.5, and 3.0, using a digital time delay to achieve a one degree separation between successive photos. While the quality of these photographs was excellent, geometrical distortions precluded any meaningful measurements of the cavitation. In the second experiment, high-speed photographs of a cavitating, four-bladed brass propeller were taken at square root of N-1.40, and at four degree intervals, utilizing a rotatable wake screen. This allowed the propeller to be photographed in an upright position making possible direct measurements of cavity size and thickness. From these measurements, an estimation of cavity volume was made, yielding a history of cavity formation and collapse. These volume estimations agree very closely, within experimental limits, with the predictions of a numerical lifting-surface theory computer model.

  • Supplemental Notes:
    • Paper presented in January 1980 to the New England Section, SNAME.
  • Corporate Authors:

    Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers

    601 Pavonia Avenue
    Jersey City, NJ  USA  07306-2907
  • Authors:
    • Peltzer, T J
  • Publication Date: 1980

Media Info

  • Pagination: 25 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00316717
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Report/Paper Numbers: Conf Paper
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Oct 8 1980 12:00AM