A COMPARISON OF ALCOHOL INVOLVEMENT IN PEDESTRIANS AND PEDESTRIAN CASUALTIES

The objectives of the study were to determine the frequency of alcohol involvement in adult (14 years +) pedestrian fatalities and injuries; determine if alcohol was overrepresented; determine the causal role of alcohol; and suggest countermeasures. Pedestrian fatalities were sampled through the New Orleans, Louisiana Coroner; non-fatal pedestrian victims were sampled through a large New Orleans hospital; and crash and control data were gathered via follow-up interviews, roadside interviews and Police files. Results showed that 50% of the pedestrian fatal and non-fatal victims had been drinking. Blood Alcohol Concentrations (BACs) were extremely high. Alcohol involved pedestrians were more often middle aged males, struck at night, on weekends and exhibited a variety of social and personal problems. Legal, educational, engineering and rehabilitation countermeasure approaches are discussed.

  • Corporate Authors:

    Dunlap and Associates, Incorporated

    Darien, CT  United States 
  • Authors:
    • Blomberg, R D
    • Preusser, D F
    • Hale, A
    • Ulmer, R G
  • Publication Date: 1979-10

Media Info

  • Pagination: 44 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00313646
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Transportation Statistical Reference File, TSC
  • Report/Paper Numbers: ED-79-115 One-Time, HS-805 248
  • Contract Numbers: DOT-HS-4-00946
  • Files: NTIS, TSR
  • Created Date: Jun 26 1980 12:00AM