The effectiveness of eco-driving training for male professional and non-professional drivers

The authors used a driving simulator study to measure the effectiveness of eco-driving training for both male professional and non-professional drivers. The eco-driving training was from only static knowledge-based information (“static” education) to guided practice driving (“dynamic” coaching). The guided driving behavior test measured participants to start and stop the vehicle, to determine an appropriate speed and display no-idling of the vehicle. A subjective questionnaire was used to generate an eco-driving score that tested the driver’s understanding of eco-driving information. The results indicated little statistically significant difference between professional and non-professional drivers for both driving behaviors and the eco-driving score, however, professional drivers showed a little more rapid start and stop behavior before receiving eco-driving training. Generally, coaching was more effective for the improvement of the subjects’ eco-driving level than education alone, however, non-professional drivers showed a greater willingness to improve their driving behavior than professional drivers. The eco-driving training showed more statistically significant to start the vehicle for professional drivers; while more statistically significant result was seen to stop the vehicle for non-professional drivers. In addition, education alone and coaching after education had a similar and obvious effect to improve both professional and non-professional driver’s understanding of the basic concepts of eco-driving and to reduce vehicle idling. However, the effectiveness of these two training methods between professional and non-professional drivers in driver’s skills to start and stop the vehicle, and determine an appropriate speed, was diverse.

Language

  • English

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Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 01665828
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Feb 26 2018 2:46PM