IGNITION OF FLAMMABLE GASES IN CRUDE OIL TANKERS AS A RESULT OF METAL FRACTURE

A literature search and an energy analysis show that the energies generated and the temperatures developed by metal fracture are not sufficient to ignite a flammable mixture of hydrocarbon vapour and air directly. It was concluded from this study that if metal fracture were to be a cause of ignition, it would be by an indirect process. The most likely cause of ignition resulting from metal fracture would be due to frictional impact or friction of fractured-metal structural members with each other or with other objects. It was also concluded that normal impact (without friction) or single rubbings would not generate sufficient energy for ignition of flammable gases in crude-oil tankers unless friction sparks also resulted.

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  • Corporate Authors:

    American Society of Naval Engineers

    Suite 507, 1012 14th Street, NW
    Washington, DC  United States  20005
  • Authors:
    • Affens, W A
    • Lange, E A
  • Publication Date: 1979-2

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Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00303329
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: British Ship Research Association
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Feb 27 1980 12:00AM