TRANSPORTATION AND REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT--SOME EMPIRICAL EVIDENCE FROM THE ATLANTIC REGION OF CANADA

The results are presented of 2 years of an on-going research project to quantify a relationship between transportation and regional economic development. Data were obtained on two specific aspects: the determination of the importance of transportation as a locational factor; and the cost of transportation as a percentage of input cost or factory gate price depending on which side of the market the transaction occurred. Analysis of location factors revealed the importance of owner/managers residence on the plant location decision. Statistics demonstrate the importance of noneconomic factors in industrial location decisions relative to the Atlantic Provinces. The significance of these non-economic factors must be considered in regional planning and policy-making. It is also concluded that improvements in transportation infrastructure especially the highway strengthening program should be designed to assist the established industrial base rather than to attempt to alter the relative attractiveness of the region for new industry.

  • Supplemental Notes:
    • From the Proceedings of the 20th Annual Meeting, Transportation Alternatives in a Changing Environment, Chicago, 29-31 October 1979.
  • Corporate Authors:

    Cross (Richard B) Company

    Oxford, Indiana,   United States  47971
  • Authors:
    • Wilson, F R
    • Brander, J R
    • Rogers, G
  • Publication Date: 1979

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Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00303239
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Report/Paper Numbers: Proceeding
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Apr 22 1980 12:00AM