THE CORROSION OF MILD STEEL BY A MARINE STRAIN OF 'DESULFOVIBRIO'

A marine strain of Desulfovibrio was isolated from steel piling detritus at Dam Neck, Virginia. The corrosion rate of mild steel in this medium, with and without the addition of Fe(++) ions, the corrosion rate was found to decrease and then either increase or remain at a low level. In the presence of added Fe(++) ions, the corrosion rate was found to increase to 255 mdd in one corrosion cell and then decrease. Chemically prepared FeS produced little change in the potential or the corrosion rate. Corrosion of mild steel in a bacteria-free culture filtrate, to which Fe(++) ions were added in excess to remove the S(-2) ions was extremely high. Inhibition of corrosion in cultures of Desulfovibrio appears to be due to the action of H2S which reacts with the iron to form a protective film and prevents the actions of the soluble depolarizer.

  • Supplemental Notes:
    • Pub. in Proceedings of International Congress on Marine Corrosion and Fouling (3rd), Gaithersburg, Md. 2-6 Oct 72, 103-119. Price of total Proceedings is $25.00.
  • Corporate Authors:

    National Bureau of Standards

    Gaithersburg, MD  USA 
  • Authors:
    • Iverson, W P
  • Publication Date: 1972

Media Info

  • Pagination: 22 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00052243
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Technical Information Service
  • Report/Paper Numbers: Final Rpt
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: May 7 1974 12:00AM