Distracted Driving 2015

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) works to reduce the occurrence of distracted driving and raise awareness of its dangers. This risky behavior poses a danger to vehicle occupants as well as pedestrians and bicyclists. Driver distraction is a specific type of driver inattention. Distraction occurs when drivers divert their attention from the driving task to focus on some other activity. Oftentimes, discussions regarding distracted driving center around cell phone use and texting, but distracted driving also includes other activities such as eating, talking to other passengers, or adjusting the radio or climate controls. A distraction-affected crash is any crash in which a driver was identified as distracted at the time of the crash. Ten percent of fatal crashes, 15 percent of injury crashes, and 14 percent of all police-reported motor vehicle traffic crashes in 2015 were reported as distraction-affected crashes. In 2015, there were 3,477 people killed and an estimated additional 391,000 injured in motor vehicle crashes involving distracted drivers. Nine percent of all drivers 15 to 19 years old involved in fatal crashes were reported as distracted at the time of the crashes. This age group has the largest proportion of drivers who were distracted at the time of the fatal crashes. In 2015, there were 551 nonoccupants (pedestrians, bicyclists, and others) killed in distraction-affected crashes.This research note is based on data from NHTSA’s Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS) and the National Automotive Sampling System (NASS) General Estimates System (GES).

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Media Type: Web
  • Features: Appendices; Figures; Tables;
  • Pagination: 6p

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 01632576
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Report/Paper Numbers: DOT HS 812 381
  • Files: HSL, TRIS, ATRI, USDOT
  • Created Date: Apr 20 2017 11:17AM