SOME INTERNATIONAL COMPARISIONS OF THE EFFECTS OF MOTOR VEHICLE SEAT BELT USE AND CHILD RESTRAINT LAWS

This paper presents original data on belt use collected in 19 cities of five countries within the past three years. In four of these countries, belt use laws were in effect in the areas studied. Also presented are preliminary data on child restraint use before and after the recent child restraint law in Tennessee. These data in conjunction with other published studies regarding belt use laws suggest tentative principles that are emerging from research on the effects of such laws. The results of the research reviewed here suggest tentative principles regarding the effectiveness of belt use and child restraint laws: 1. Compliance with the laws is greater when there are fewer exemptions. 2. Belt use laws do not reduce deaths and injury as much as expected from known effectiveness of belts when worn voluntarily.

  • Supplemental Notes:
    • Presented at the Child Passenger Safety Conference sponsored by the Transportation Center, University of Tennessee, Nashville, May 10, 1978.
  • Corporate Authors:

    Insurance Institute for Highway Safety

    1005 North Glebe Road
    Arlington, VA  United States  22201
  • Authors:
    • Robertson, L S
    • Williams, A F
  • Publication Date: 1978-5-10

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: 18 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00308855
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Safety Council Safety Research Info Serv
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: May 21 1980 12:00AM