Bike Network Mapping Idea Book

This resource highlights ways that different communities have mapped their existing and proposed bicycle networks. It shows examples of maps at different scales, while also demonstrating a range of mapping strategies, techniques, and approaches. Facility types represented on the respective maps and legends are each different because they represent a community’s unique context and needs. It is intended to serve as a resource as communities work to identify, plan, and improve their bicycle networks. Connected pedestrian and bicycle networks make walking, wheeling, and bicycling viable transportation choices for everyone. Networks enhance access to jobs, schools, and health care, while also promoting equity, physical activity, and health. Connected networks are comprised of a range of facility types (e.g. bike lanes, separated bike lanes, shared use paths, etc.), linked together to facilitate short trips to and from destinations and long linear connections across a city or region. A first step to achieving connected networks is to document where bicycling infrastructure currently exists. It is also essential to establish a vision for the future network. This vision is often captured in the form of a map and it’s developed as part of a local planning process that includes opportunities for public participation and input. A community’s existing and proposed bicycle network maps inform the day-to-day programming and prioritization of projects and help to ensure that all transportation improvements are enhancing the quality of the nonmotorized network and capturing opportunities to make linkages between existing and new facilities.

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Media Type: Digital/other
  • Features: Figures; Maps;
  • Pagination: 57p

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 01605748
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Report/Paper Numbers: FHWA-HEP-16-054
  • Files: NTL, TRIS, ATRI, USDOT
  • Created Date: Jul 11 2016 10:28AM