BEHAVIOR OF SPHERICAL CONCRETE HULLS UNDER HYDROSTATIC LOADING. PART III. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THICKNESS-TO- DIAMETER RATIO AND CRITICAL PRESSURES, STRAINS, AND WATER PERMEATION RATES.

Sixteen hollow concrete shperes of 16-inch outside diameter were subjected to external hydrostatic pressure to investigate the relationship between the spheres shell thickness and ( 1 ) its critical pressure, ( 2 ) permeability, and ( 3 ) strain magnitude. The shell thickness of the spheres varied from 1 inch to 4 inches in 1-inch steps. All spheres were cast from the same concrete mix, cured under identical temperature and moisture conditions, and tested in the same manner. The strength of concrete in the spheres at the time of testing, as established by uniaxial compression tests on 3 x 6-inch cylinders, was in the 9,000-to-11,000-PSI range. The critical pressure of waterproofed hollow concrete spheres was found to be approximately a linear function of the spheres thickness; the spheres imploded at pressures from 3,240 to 13,900 PSI, depending on their thickness, concrete spheres permeated by seawater failed at hydrostatic pressures 30% to 15% lower than identical waterproofed spheres. In all cases the stress in the spheres at the time of implosion was considerably higher than in concrete test cylinders prepared of the same mix and of the same curing history subjected to uniaxial compression.

  • Corporate Authors:

    Naval Civil Engineering Laboratory

    Port Hueneme, CA  USA 
  • Authors:
    • Stachiw, J D
    • MACK, K
  • Publication Date: 1968-6

Media Info

  • Pagination: 72 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00002133
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Defense Documentation Center
  • Report/Paper Numbers: NCELTR 588 Tech Rpt.
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Oct 30 1972 12:00AM