EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL STUDIES OF PAVEMENT BEHAVIOUR UNDER VEHICULAR LOADING IN RELATION TO ELASTIC THEORY

The paper describes a series of experiments to determine the degree to which multi-layer elastic theory can be used to predict stresses, strains and deflections of pavements under moving vehicles. Measurements of stress and deflection in flexible pavements of realistic design have been made under pilot-scale conditions over a wide range of wheel loads, speeds and temperatures, and similar tests have also been carried out on a simple concrete slab. Results are presented showing the effects of temperature and wheel load on the measured behavior and this is compared with that predicted from multi-layer elastic theory using data derived from both labaratory and in-situ testing. The results show that elastic theory can be used to predict the dynamic behavior of relatively stiff pavements, but that deviations occur under high temperature conditions, where it is difficult to establish an effective modulus for bituminous materials because of the rapid change in dynamic modulus with the timescale of the loading, and for pavements which derive a large part of their structural stiffness from granular materials. /AUTHOR/

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: p. 521-535
  • Serial:
    • Volume: 1

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00261940
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Report/Paper Numbers: Proceeding
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Oct 22 1974 12:00AM