HEALTH EFFECTS OF EXPOSURE TO AUTOMOBILE EXHAUST. IV. ASSESSMENT OF LEAD EXPOSURE IN TRAFFIC POLICEMEN

Two groups of policemen, totalling 268 men, volunteered to participate in a prospective study of the health effects of exposure to automobile exhaust. The men were divided approximately equally between traffic officers and outskirt station officers who patrol in police cruisers. Hair levels of lead correlated well with exposure in traffic. Fourteen men had hair lead levels which were high. Home sources for lead were excluded by assessment of the wives of those men with high hair lead levels and a control group of wives of men with normal hair lead levels. In spite of some extremely high levels of hair lead, no man showed evidence of lead intoxication, nor did any man have significantly elevated blood lead levels. At street sites where it was possible to monitor both during normal street conditions and times when the streets were forbidden to all traffic, lead in the air was reduced by as much as a factor of 15. These data suggest that men exposed to urban traffic do have an increased burden of lead. However, there is no evidence that this increased burden has any demonstrable toxicity in regard to lead itself. The original idea of using hair lead as an indicator of chronic automobile exposures appears to be justified. (Covering abstract of conference is IRRD Abstract No 209295).

  • Corporate Authors:

    International Symposium on Environment

    Case Pastale 1003
    Luxembourg,   Luxembourg 
  • Authors:
    • Speizer, F E
    • Ferris, B G
    • Burgess, N A
    • Kopito, L K
  • Conference:
  • Publication Date: 1973-4

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: p. 835-847

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00261701
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Transport and Road Research Laboratory (TRRL)
  • Files: ITRD, TRIS
  • Created Date: Nov 6 1974 12:00AM