THE ABILITY OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOL CHILDREN TO SENSE ONCOMING CAR VELOCITY

Forty children, aged 5 to 14, were asked to classify as slow, medium or fast the velocity of vehicles approaching them on a two-lane rural road in a residential setting. Developmental aspects are definitely present. The older the child the more likely he is to make correct SLOW and MEDIUM judgements of the vehicle's velocity. However, the correct judgements of FAST are inversely related to age. This puts the older child at a greater risk. Sex is also a significant variable. The females in the sample were much more conservative and, therefore, much more likely to correctly classify the dangerous fast vehicles. By contrast, the males in the sample made more correct judgements over the whole speed range. Results indicate considerable differences associated with age and sex. Vehicle associated characteristics, such as size and noise, are shown to influence the velocity judgement.

  • Corporate Authors:

    Public Health Service

    Injury Control Research Laboratory
    Providence, RI  United States 
  • Authors:
    • Salvatore, S
  • Publication Date: 1972

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: 26 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00262028
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Safety Council Safety Res Info Serv
  • Report/Paper Numbers: ICRL-RR-71-1
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Nov 20 1974 12:00AM