SHOPPER ATTITUDES

RESEARCH WAS CONDUCTED TO DETERMINE THE PLACE AND IMPORTANCE OF PARKING IN THE WEB OF INTERRELATED MOTIVES ASSOCIATED WITH CONSUMERS' USE OF THE SHOPPING FACILITIES OF THE CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT OR OF SUBURBAN SHOPPING CENTERS. THE PHENOMENA STUDIED ARE AN ASPECT OF THE LARGER PROCESS OF URBAN DECENTRALIZATION AND THE RESULTING REORGANIZATION OF STRUCTURAL AND FUNCTIONAL PATTERNS OF THE URBAN COMMUNITY BROUGHT ABOUT BY TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS IN TRANSPORTATION AND COMMUNICATION IN COLUMBUS, OHIO. FOLLOWING THE RESEARCH IN COLUMBUS, STUDIES WERE MADE IN HOUSTON, TEXAS, AND SEATTLE, WASH. TO RETEST THE METHODOLOGY AND INSTRUMENTS AND DISCOVER HOW THESE OPERATE UNDER DIFFERENT CONDITIONS. SHOPPING ATTITUDES AND BEHAVIOR WERE FOUND TO BE MEASUREABLE. ANALYSIS SHOWED THAT MOST OF THE ITEMS CONCERNED WITH COST, SERVICE, QUALITY, SHOPPING CONDITIONS, AND FREQUENCY OF SHOPPING WERE AS EFFECTIVE IN HOUSTON AND SEATTLE AS IN COLUMBUS IN DISCRIMINATING BETWEEN DOWNTOWN AND SUBURBAN SHOPPERS. SERIES OF INTERVIEWS, FIELD TESTS, AND STATISTICAL ANALYSES MADE IT POSSIBLE TO DRAW UP A LIST OF FACTORS AFFECTING SHOPPING ATTITUDES AND BEHAVIOR. EXAMINATION OF THE SPATIAL PATTERN REVEALS THAT FOOD, DOCTOR'S CARE AND MOVIES ARE SOUGHT IN AREAS NEARER HOME, AND THAT BUYING OF CLOTHING, SHOES AND HOUSE FURNISHINGS IS PREDOMINATELY DOWNTOWN. COMPARISON OF DOWNTOWN AND SUBURBAN SHOPPING AREAS REVEALS THAT THE DOWNTOWN SECTION HAS THE ADVANTAGE OVER THE SUBURBAN SHOPPING CENTERS IN ALL THREE CITIES ON SIXTEEN OF THE TWENTY-THREE FACTORS. THE MOST IMPORTANT DISADVANTAGE OF THE CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT WAS DIFFICULT PARKING. NEXT IN IMPORTANCE FOR ALL CITIES WAS CROWDING, AND TRAFFIC CONGESTION. IT APPEARS THAT THE EFFECT OF DISTANCE IS MINIMIZED OR OVERCOME UNDER CERTAIN SITUATIONS AND CONDITIONS BY THE PRESENCE OF OTHER VARIABLES. A TENDENCY IS INDICATED FOR FEMALES TO BE MORE ORIENTED TO DOWNTOWN THAN MALES. COMPARISON OF VARIOUS MAJOR OCCUPATIONAL GROUPS IN HOUSTON AND SEATTLE SHOWED THAT PROFESSIONALS, MANAGERS, PROPRIETORS, AND CLERICAL AND SALES CATEGORIES ARE VERY SIMILAR IN THEIR BEHAVIOR AND ATTITUDE. IT APPEARS THAT LACK OF A LARGE SELECTION IS FELT MORE STRONGLY AS A DISADVANTAGE OF THE SUBURBAN SHOPPING CENTERS BY THE UPPER SOCIALECONOMIC GROUPS THAN BY THE LOWER, AND BY THE YOUNGER AGE GROUPS, THAN BY THE OLDER. IT SEEMS THAT TRENDS IN SHOPPING GOODS SALES INDICATE THAT THE PERCENTAGE INCREASES IN SHOPPING GOODS TOTAL SALES HAVE BEEN PROPORTIONATELY GREATER IN SUBURBAN SHOPPING CENTERS THAN IN THE DOWNTOWN SECTION OF SOME CITIES.

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  • Supplemental Notes:
    • Distribution, posting, or copying of this PDF is strictly prohibited without written permission of the Transportation Research Board of the National Academy of Sciences. Unless otherwise indicated, all materials in this PDF are copyrighted by the National Academy of Sciences. Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. Part A This report was published a supplement to Highway Research Board Special Report 11, "Parking as a Factor in Business."
  • Authors:
    • Jonassen, C T
  • Publication Date: 1955

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  • Accession Number: 00239890
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS, TRB
  • Created Date: Aug 4 1994 12:00AM