THE VARIABILITY OF COLLISION INVOLVEMENT AT LOW BLOOD ALCOHOL CONCENTRATIONS: THE GRAND RAPIDS CURVE EXPLAINED

The curve from the Grand Rapids study showing the relative probability of causing a collision at given alcohol levels has caused much discussion and controversy. The point of contention is that the curve shows that drivers with BACS (blood alcohol concentrations) of 0.01% to 0.03% are less likely to cause a collision than those who had not been drinking. This has been misinterpreted to mean that drivers can drive more safely if they had a little to drink than if they had nothing to drink. A more recent treatment of the Grand Rapids data shows that the likelihood of being involved in collision at low BACS varies widely over time of day, and those drivers who appear to be involved in fewer collisions at low alcohol levels tend to be different from those who had nothing to drink. They not only drive at different times of day, they are also more experienced at both drinking and driving. Being generally superior drivers they could indulge in small amounts of alcohol and still perform better than the less proficient drivers who had nothing to drink. This could be true in spite of the fact that they may have deteriorated from their predrinking proficiency. /Author/

  • Availability:
  • Corporate Authors:

    International Com on Alcohol Drugs & Traf Safety

    Hammerbrookstrasse 93
    2000 Hamburg 1,   Germany 
  • Authors:
    • ZYLMAN, R
  • Publication Date: 1972-1

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: p. 25-32
  • Serial:
    • Blutalkohol
    • Volume: 9
    • Issue Number: 1
    • Publisher: Bund gegen Alkohol im Strassenverkehr eV
    • ISSN: 0006-5250

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00260138
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Transport and Road Research Laboratory (TRRL)
  • Report/Paper Numbers: HS-011 643
  • Files: HSL, ITRD, TRIS
  • Created Date: Oct 5 1974 12:00AM