CENTER CITY TRANSPORTATION PROJECT: ATLANTA

THE ATLANTA, GEORGIA, PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM PROVIDES AN EFFECTIVE ALTERNATIVE TO THE AUTOMOBILE ONLY WHEN THE LATTER IS UNABAILABLE OR INCONVENIENT TO USE. SINCE WORLD WAR II, ATLANTA'S MAIN TRANSPORTATION IMPROVEMENT HAS BEEN AN EXPRESSWAY NETWORK SUPPLEMENTED BY FIVE ARTERIAL HIGHWAYS RADIATING OUT FROM THE HEART OF THE CITY. IN A RADIUS OF ROUGHLY THREE MILES FROM THE DOWNTOWN SECTION, THESE ARTERIALS MUST CROSS A BELT OF RAILROAD LINES THAT ACT AS A TRAFFIC BARRIER IN MUCH THE SAME WAY THAT A RIVER DOES IN OTHER CITIES. AT THESE CORDON POINTS, TRAFFIC FLOW IS RESTRICTED. THE EXPRESSWAYS HAVE HIGH VOLUMES OF TRAFFIC, PARTICULARLY ON APPROACHES TO THE CENTER CITY. AN INITIAL PROPOSAL FOR THE ATLANTA CCTP WAS THE INSTITUTION OF SHUTTLE BUS SERVICE BETWEEN DOWNTOWN AND UNDERUTILIZED PARKING LOTS AT THE STADIUM AND CIVIC CENTER. THE ATLANTA TRANSIT SYSTEM (ATS) HAD THE BUSES, AND THERE WAS SUFFICIENT PARKING LOTS IN THE AREA. THE ATS WAS WILLING TO BEGIN OPERATING SHUTTLE BUSES AT ONCE WITHOUT ANY FINANCIAL AID, PROVIDED THAT THE CITY MADE ITS PARKING LOTS AVAILABLE. DURING DECEMBER, 1969, THE SERVICE OPERATED FOR 14 HOURS DAILY THROUGH THE DOWNTOWN AREA. THE SERVICE CHARGE WAS 50found FOR A PARKING SPACE AND ROUND TRIP BUS RIDE TO AND FROM DOWNTOWN FOR EACH OCCUPANT OF THE PARKED CAR. THE ATS PROVIDED BUSES, DRIVERS, AND PARKING LOT ATTENDANTS; THE CITY FURNISHED THE PARKING LOTS AT NO COST, AND DOWNTOWN BUSINESS INTERESTS HELPED WITH THE INITIAL PROMOTIONAL CAMPAIGN. ALTHOUGH THE 50found FARE COVERED ONLY ABOUT 30% OF THE OPERATING COSTS ORIGIN AND DESTINATION SURVEYS REVEALED THAT OVER ONE-HALF OF THE RIDERS USED THE SERVICE REGULARLY AND THAT THERE WAS HIGH LATENT DEMAND. DOWNTOWN PARKING STUDIES SHOWED THAT THERE WAS AN EMERGING PARKING PROBLEM, PARTICULARLY IN THE CORE OF THE CENTER CITY WHERE THERE IS ALREADY A SHORTAGE OF LONG-TERM PARKING FACILITIES. TO COMPOUND THIS PROBLEM, CURRENTLY PLANNED NEW OFFICE CONSTRUCTION WILL GENERATE A PARKING DEMAND CONSERVATIVELY ESTIMATED AT 1,000 NEW SPACES PER YEAR. THESE PROBLEMS INDICATE A NEED FOR PERIPHERAL PARKING FACILITIES IN THE NEAR FUTURE. /UMTA/

  • Supplemental Notes:
    • PROJ NO IRD 44
  • Corporate Authors:

    Little (Arthur D), Incorporated

    Acorn Park
    Cambridge, MA  USA  02140
  • Publication Date: 1970-9

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00239544
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Urban Mass Transportation Administration
  • Files: TRIS, USDOT
  • Created Date: Nov 7 1982 12:00AM