SELECTION, ESTABLISHMENT, AND MAINTENANCE OF VEGETATION FOR EROSION CONTROL OF ROADSIDE AREAS IN GEORGIA. INTERIM REPORT-PHASE II

One hundred ninety two sites of 45 plots each were planted over a two year period throughout Georgia to examine problems associated with establishment and maintenance of vegetation on backslopes along highways. Variables under investigation which are covered in this report are (1) need for topsoil, (2) season of seedling, (3) slope of seedbed, (4) exposure aspect, (5) major plant species, (6) nurse crops, (7) maintenance fertilization, and (8) physiograph zone. Other variables under consideration are (1) rainfall, (2) air temperature, (3) plant canopy temperature, (4) soil temperature, (5) seedling rates, (6) growth regulators, and (7) soil density which will be treated in subsequent reports. Observations during three growing seasons confirm the findings from other states that topsoil is not required for establishment of grass and legumes. Spring planting was better than mid-summer to fall planting. Better plant growth was observed on flatter slopes. Zonation of the state, done under Phase I of this project, continues to be supported by these data. South- and West-facing slopes are the most difficult to vegetate in the northern part of Georgia. Mixed fertilizer at 1,500 pounds per acre was adequate for three seasons growth. Interstate lespedeza was better adapted than Sericea. Two new species--Virgata lespedeza and Brunswickgrass--show promise as roadside plants.

  • Corporate Authors:

    University of Georgia, Athens

    College of Business Administration
    Athens, GA  USA  30602
  • Authors:
    • McCreery, R A
    • Diseker, E G
    • Lawrence Jr, R M
  • Publication Date: 1974-3

Media Info

  • Pagination: 120 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00260900
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Federal Highway Administration
  • Report/Paper Numbers: No 6907
  • Files: TRIS, USDOT
  • Created Date: Oct 5 1974 12:00AM