FROST DAMAGE TO ROADS IN GREAT BRITAIN

LOW TEMPERATURE CONDITIONS SUFFICIENTLY PROLONGED TO CAUSE SERIOUS DAMAGE TO ROADS RARELY OCCUR IN GREAT BRITAIN. HOWEVER, DURING OCCASIONAL VERY SEVERE WINTERS WIDESPREAD DAMAGE DOES OCCUR. THE MOST COMMON FORM OF FROST DAMAGE TO CONCRETE WHEN USED AS A ROAD SURFACING, IS SPALLING ARISING FROM THE EXPANSION ON FREEZING OF THE WATER CONTAINED IN THE UPPER VOIDS OF THE CONCRETE. DAMAGE TO BITUMINOUS SURFACINGS MAY ARISE DUE TO STRIPPING OF THE AGGREGATE WITH THE RESULT THAT LOCAL AREAS OF THE SURFACING DISINTEGRATE UNDER TRAFFIC. HEAVE IN THE SUBGRADE GIVES RISE TO THE MOST SERIOUS FORM OF FROST DAMAGE TO ROADS. IF THE THICKNESS OF CONSTRUCTION IN GREAT BRITAIN IS GREATER THAN ABOUT 18 INCHES, THE POSSIBILITY OF DAMAGE FROM FROST HEAVE IS ALMOST NEGLIGIBLE. CHALK, WHICH OCCURS NEAR THE GROUND SURFACE OVER CONSIDERABLE AREAS OF SOUTHEAST AND EAST ENGLAND, IS A PARTICULARLY TROUBLESOME SUBGRADE MATERIAL FROM THE POINT OF VIEW OF FROST HEAVE. AS SOON AS THE THAW SETS IN AFTER A BAD FROST, AFFECTED ROADS ARE, AS FAR AS POSSIBLE, CLOSED TO TRAFFIC UNTIL SUBGRADE MOISTURE CONDITIONS RETURN TO NORMAL. THIS FREQUENTLY PREVENTS ANY EXTENSIVE BREAKUP.

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  • Accession Number: 00237859
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS, TRB
  • Created Date: Aug 26 1970 12:00AM