WATER STABILITY OF AGGREGATES IN A HEATED BLACK COTTON SOIL: II RESULTS ON THE BASIS OF AGGREGATE-SIZE DISTRIBUTION IN THE DRY STATE

A NEW METHOD OF REFRACTIONATION IS PRESENTED WHICH ENABLES ANALYSIS OF WET-SIEVED DRIED AGGREGATES GIVING WATER-STABLE AGGREGATE-SIZE DISTRIBUTION IN THE DRY STATE. SOIL AGGREGATES HEATED TO VERY HIGH TEMPERATURES ARE DISINTEGRATED AND HAVE LOWER WATER STABILITY (THAN THE OPTIMUM VALUE OF AGGREGATION AND WATER STABILITY), DUE TO THE PHENOMENON OF SELF-INDUCED SHATTERING (AUTOPHORETIC DISPERSION), WHICH CAN BE COMPARED TO DESICCATION, DECREPITATION, OR INCIPIENT FUSION. EFFECT OF HEAT ON SOILS CAN NOW BE CLASSIFIED AS FOLLOWS: (1) INITIAL SHRINKAGE AT VERY LOW HEATING TEMPERATURE, (2) LOOSE-PAIR FORMATION, RESULTING IN INSTANTANEOUS REHYDRATION OF THE SEMIHYDRATED AGGREGATES, AND HENCE, DECREASED WATER STABILITY, (3) COLLAPSE OF THE CLAY STRUCTURE, FOLLOWED BY AGGREGATION AND HIGH WATER STABILITY, (4) AN OPTIMUM TEMPERATURE OF HEATING AT WHICH AGGREGATION AND WATER STABILITY ARE BOTH AT A MAXIMUM, AND (5) THE DISINTEGRATION THAT TAKES PLACE AT HIGH TEMPERATURES OF HEATING AND RESULTS IN DECREASED WATER STABILITY, DUE TO AUTOPHORETIC SHATTERING OF THE SOIL AGGREGATES IN CONTACT WITH WATER BECAUSE OF ABSORPTIVE INTERACTIONS.

  • Supplemental Notes:
    • Vol 104, No 5, PP 370-373, 2 FIG, 6 REF
  • Authors:
    • Gupta, G C
    • Dutta, A K
  • Publication Date: 1967-11

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  • Accession Number: 00237439
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Feb 13 1994 12:00AM