THE INFLUENCES OF STRUCTURE ON THE DILATATION OF CLAY

SOILS HAVING DIFFERENT SOIL STRUCTURES WERE FORMED BY SEDIMENTATION IN SODIUM CHLORIDE AND SODIUM HEXAMETAPHOSPHATE SOLUTIONS, FOLLOWED BY LEACHING, TO ACHIEVE VARIOUS FINAL SALT CONCENTRATIONS. THE DILATATION CHARACTERISTICS WERE OBSERVED BY THE MEASUREMENT OF EXCESS PORE PRESSURE IN CIU TRIAXIAL TESTS. IT WAS OBSERVED THAT THE TENDENCY OF THE CLAY TO DILATE DURING SHEAR WAS DEPENDENT ON THE STRESS HISTORY, THE AMOUNT OF RECOVERABLE STRAIN ENERGY IN THE SOIL, AND THE STRENGTH OF THE DIAGENETIC BONDS. THE SOIL WITH THE STRONGEST DIAGENETIC BONDS STORED THE MOST RECOVERABLE STRAIN ENERGY DURING OVERCONSOLIDATION. THUS, IT EXHIBITED THE GREATEST TENDENCY TO DILATE BECAUSE OF THE RELEASE OF THIS ENERGY DURING FAILURE OF THE DIAGENETIC BONDS. IN NORMALLY CONSOLIDATED SOIL STRAIN, ENERGY WAS NOT STORED IN THE DIAGENETIC BONDS AND, THEREFORE, DILATATION DID NOT OCCUR. /AUTHOR/

  • Authors:
    • NELSON, J D
    • Siu, K L
  • Publication Date: 0

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Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00238239
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Transport and Road Research Laboratory (TRRL)
  • Report/Paper Numbers: Conf Paper
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Nov 3 1973 12:00AM