Distance Driven and Economic Activity in the Individual U.S. States: 1997-2011

During these times of heightened concern about energy and the environment, it is desirable to have relatively high economic activity per unit of driving. Thus, this study examined the current variations among the U.S. states and the District of Columbia in Gross domestic product (GDP) per distance driven and the recent changes in this parameter. In 2011, the highest GDP per distance driven was in the District of Columbia ($30.04/mile, followed by Alaska, New York, Connecticut, and Delaware. The lowest GDP per distance driven was in Mississippi ($2.51/mile), followed by Alabama, New Mexico, Arkansas, and Oklahoma. The median value was $4.66/mile. In comparison, the standard federal reimbursement rate for fixed and variable costs of operating an automobile in 2011 was $0.51/mile. From 1997 to 2011, the largest absolute increase in GDP per distance driven (with GDP measured in current dollars) was in the District of Columbia (+$14.95/mile), followed by Alaska, New York, Delaware, and Oregon. The smallest increase was in Mississippi (+$0.67/mile), followed by Alabama, Michigan. Florida, and New Mexico. The largest percentage increase from 1997 to 2011 in GDP per distance driven was in Wyoming (+115%), followed by the District of Columbia, North Dakota, Alaska, and Oregon. The smallest increase was in Michigan (+28%), followed by Florida, Ohio, Mississippi, and New Jersey. The increases in four states (Michigan, Florida, Ohio, and Mississippi) were smaller than the corresponding increases in inflation.

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Media Type: Digital/other
  • Features: Figures; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: 14p

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 01493354
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Report/Paper Numbers: UMTRI-2013-31
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Sep 11 2013 9:50AM