Load-Carrying Capacity and Required Reinforcement Strength of Closely Spaced Soil-Geosynthetic Composites

In current design methods for reinforced soil walls, it has been tacitly assumed that reinforcement strength and reinforcement spacing play an equal role. This fundamental design assumption has led to the use of larger reinforcement spacing (0.3–1.0 m) in conjunction with stronger reinforcement to reduce construction time. Recent studies, however, have clearly indicated that the role of reinforcement spacing is much more significant than that of reinforcement strength. With closely spaced (reinforcement spacing ≤0.3 m) reinforcement, the beneficial effects of geosynthetic inclusion is significantly enhanced, and the load-deformation behavior can be characterized as that of a composite material. A reinforced soil mass with closely spaced geosynthetic reinforcement is referred to as geosynthetic-reinforced soil (GRS). In this study, an analytical model is developed for predicting the ultimate load-carrying capacity and required reinforcement strength of a GRS mass. The model was developed based on a semiempirical equation that reflects the relative roles of reinforcement spacing and reinforcement strength in a GRS mass. Using measured data from field-scale experiments available to date, it is shown that the analytical model is capable of predicting the ultimate load-carrying capacity and required reinforcement strength of a GRS mass with good accuracy.

Language

  • English

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Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 01491897
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS, ASCE
  • Created Date: Aug 14 2013 10:25AM