FIELD PROCEDURE ON PLASTIC WRAPPED ROADS

A RADICAL DEPARTURE FROM CONVENTIONAL METHODS OF ROAD CONSTRUCTION IS GAINING NATIONAL PROMINENCE WITH THE PLACEMENT OF AN ACTUAL ROAD AT A MILITARY INSTALLATION. THE CONSTRUCTION OF ROADS BY THE MEMBRANE-ENVELOPED SOIL LAVER (MESL) PROCESS IS BASED ON THE PRINCIPLE THAT THE SOIL ITSELF WILL SUPPORT MILITARY CARGO VEHICLE TRAFFIC IF MOISTURE IS SEALED OFF. THE ONLY CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS NEEDED ARE PLASTIC MEMBRANE, FABRIC, ASPHALT, AND NATIVE MEMBRANES WHICH ARE JOINED AND SEALED ALONG THE EDGES TO FORM A WATERPROOF ENCAPSULATED SOIL SYSTEM. A ONE-HALF MILE, TWO-LANE TEST ROAD WAS RECENTLY BUILT IN LESS THAN A WEEK BY A CREW OF 12 AT FORT HOOD, TEXAS. THE TECHNIQUE PROVIDES THE MILITARY WITH THE ABILITY TO CONSTRUCT ROADS WHEN AGGREGATES REQUIRED FOR CONVENTIONAL METHODS ARE NOT AVAILABLE. STEPS IN THE PROCESS ARE SHOWN IN THE FIGURES. /ARTICLE/

  • Publication Date: 1972-12

Media Info

  • Features: Figures;
  • Pagination: p. 398-9
  • Serial:
    • Military Engineer
    • Volume: 64
    • Issue Number: 422
    • Publisher: Society of Military Engineers

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00233357
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: May 7 1973 12:00AM