Stability and change in risky driving from the late teens to the late twenties

Little is known about the factors associated with different across-time patterns of risky driving behaviour. This paper - the product of a collaborative partnership between the Australian Institute of Family Studies, the Transport Accident Commission of Victoria and the Royal Automobile Club of Victoria - uses data from the longitudinal Australian Temperament Project to: (a) examine patterns of risky driving from the late teens to the late twenties; and (b) to identify factors associated with persistence and change in risky driving tendencies. The key messages identified by the study included: 1. Rates of risky driving remained fairly stable between the ages of 19-20 and 23-24 years, but had significantly decreased by 27-28 years; 2. While there was a general trend for levels of risky driving to decrease, considerable variability was found in the risky driving patterns of individuals over this period; 3. Antisocial behaviour appeared to be strongly linked to persistence and change in risky driving, adding support to the view that risky driving may form part of a broader underlying propensity to engage in problem behaviour(s); 4. Low social skills were associated with an increasing propensity for risky driving among some young drivers; 5. Binge drinking, gender, and parental status also differentiated between drivers who exhibited different across-time patterns of risky driving; 6. Findings add to a growing body of research, which suggests that risky drivers are not identical - the factors that underlie their behaviour may differ.

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  • Availability:
  • Supplemental Notes:
    • Report prepared for the Transport Accident Commission of Victoria and the Royal Automobile Club of Victoria
  • Corporate Authors:

    Australian Institute of Family Studies

    Melbourne, Victoria   
  • Authors:
    • VASSALLO, S
    • Lahausse, J
    • Edwards, B
  • Publication Date: 2013-3

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Pagination: 17p
  • Serial:
    • Issue Number: 51

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 01481755
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: ARRB
  • ISBN: 9781922038159
  • Files: ATRI
  • Created Date: May 21 2013 10:54AM