THE BRITTLE BEHAVIOUR OF NATURALLY CEMENTED SOILS

THE MECHANICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF CEMENTATION IS STUDIED BY MEANS OF A LABORATORY TEST PROGRAM INVOLVING THREE CANADIAN CLAYS. AN INITIALLY ELASTIC STRESS-STRAIN BEHAVIOR IS OBSERVED UNDER TRIAXIAL COMPRESSIVE LOADING AT LOW TEST PRESSURES, AND THE CEMENTATION BOND STRENGTH IS ESSENTIALLY INDEPENDENT OF EFFECTIVE STRESSES. AT HIGHER TEST PRESSURES AN 'UNSTRUCTURED' EFFECTIVE STRENGTH PARAMETER PHI' IS DEFINED. THE FISSURED NATURE OF THE SOIL STRUCTURE CAN LEAD TO A SIGNIFICANT SCATTERING OF STRENGTH DATA. THIS OCCURS IN TESTS WHERE AN ABSENCE OF CONFINING PRESSURE ENABLES A TENSILE STRESS SYSTEM TO BE DEVELOPED IN THE SOIL, AS IN INDIRECT TENSION AND UNCONFINED COMPRESSION TESTS ON SOAKED SPECIMENS. IT IS CONCLUDED THAT STRENGTH TEST RESULTS CANNOT BE SIMPLY IN TERMS OF CLASSICAL BEHAVIOR THEORIES, AND THAT A RE-EVALUATION OF DESIGN PROCEDURES FOR BONDED SOILS MAY BE REQUIRED. /A/RRL/

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00234894
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Road Research Laboratory /UK
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Aug 26 1970 12:00AM