SOIL-CEMENT IN RECONSTRUCTION OF LINCOLN HIGHWAY, SOUTH AUSTRALIA

THE USE OF SALT WATER, WHILE APPARENTLY SATISFACTORY IN THE MIXING OF THE SOIL-CEMENT, WAS FOUND WHEN USED AS A CURING MEDIUM TO RESULT IN A CONCENTRATION OF SALTS ON THE SURFACE OF THE PAVEMENT, PREVENTING SAFISFACTORY ADHESION OF THE BITUMINOUS EMULSION CURING COAT. IN A FEW AREAS THE SOIL-CEMENT APPEARED TO DEVELOP A FINE CRACKING PATTERN. THE SOIL IN THESE AREAS, OBTAINED FROM BORROW PITS, CONTAINED HIGH CONCENTRATIONS OF SULFATE. THE 'GROWTH' AND DISINTEGRATION OF CYLINDERS MOULDED FROM SOILS FROM THESE BORROW PITS WAS SPECTACULAR, ILLUSTRATING CLEARLY THE EFFECT OF SULFATE ATTACK ON THE CEMENT.

  • Supplemental Notes:
    • Vol 32, No 2, PP 35-38
  • Corporate Authors:

    Concrete Publishing Company

    147 Walker Street North
    Sydney, New South Wales 2060,   Australia 
  • Authors:
    • Page, G C
  • Publication Date: 0

Media Info

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Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00231742
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Highway Research Board Bibliography
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Jan 19 1970 12:00AM