EFFECTS OF FREEZE-THAW PARAMETERS ON THE DURABILITY OF STABILIZED MATERIALS

A study was conducted to evaluate the effects of various frost-action parameters on the freeze-thaw durability of stabilized materials and to determine which parameters could be modified so that a characteristic freeze-thaw cycle could be adapted to laboratory use. The parameters studied were cooling rate, freezing temperature, length of freezing period, and thawing temperature. The cooling rate was found to be an important factor affecting the freeze-thaw durability of stabilized soils. Lower cooling rates (0.2 to 2.0 F/hr) that correlated best with quantitative field data were generally the most detrimental to durability. A sustained freezing study revealed that the length of the freezing period did not have to be greater than that required to accomplish complete freezing of the test specimen. The study further indicated that freezing and thawing temperatures should be representative of those for in-service pavement systems. Thawing temperatures for some stabilized materials are important because strength increase caused by a pozzolanic reaction is possible at high temperatures. The number of cycles used in a laboratory freeze-thaw test should be related to geographical location, climatic conditions, and position of the stabilized layer in the pavement system. For Illinois climatic conditions, a laboratory freeze-thaw cycle representative of field conditions would require a completion period of 48 hours.

Media Info

  • Media Type: Print
  • Pagination: p. 10-18
  • Monograph Title: Cement-stabilized soil
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00043778
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Report/Paper Numbers: ISBN 0-309-01994-X
  • Files: TRIS, TRB
  • Created Date: Jun 1 1973 12:00AM