CONTINUED CONFUSION IN THE CLASSIFICATION OF FAULTS

THE CLASSIFICATION OF FAULTS MOST WIDELY PUBLICIZED IN RECENT YEARS IS THAT OF MASON HILL (1963), ONE PART OF WHICH DEALS WITH CLASSIFICATION BY SEPARATIONS. THREE EXAMPLES ARE GIVEN HERE TO SHOW THAT THE CLASSES DEFINED ARE NOT MUTUALLY EXCLUSIVE: FAULTS ARE, FOR EXAMPLE, LEFT-LATERAL OR RIGHT- LATERAL, OR REVERSE OR NORMAL, DEPENDING ON HOW THE SURFACES ARE VIEWED. THE MISTAKE MADE IN ALL SUCH CLASSIFICATIONS IS TO ASSUME THAT ALL SURFACES CUT BY A FAULT HAVE SEPARATIONS WITH THE SAME SENSE OF APPARENT DISPLACEMENT AS VIEWED IN HORIZONTAL OR VERTICAL CROSS SECTIONS. THEY DO NOT. HILL'S CLASSIFICATION WAS NAMED THE "DUAL CLASSIFICATION OF FAULTS." THE OTHER HALF WAS BASED ON MOVEMENTS ALONG THE FAULT SURFACE. THIS IS ON SOUNDER GROUND BECAUSE, ON MOST FAULTS, MOVEMENTS ARE REASONABLY UNIFORM OVER LARGE AREAS OF THE FAULT SURFACE. HOWEVER, IT IS INCOMPLETE. NO PROVISION IS MADE FOR ROTATIONAL MOVEMENTS, NOR IS THERE ANY PLACE FOR VERTICAL OR HORIZONTAL FAULTS. IT IS, IN FACT, A CLASSIFICATION OF INCLINED TRANSLATIONAL FAULTS, NOT OF ALL FAULTS. A REVISED VERSION IS SUGGESTED IN A TABLE. /AUTHOR/

  • Supplemental Notes:
    • Vol 82, No 5, PP 1389-1392, 4 FIG, 2 TAB, 4 REF
  • Authors:
    • Gill, J E
  • Publication Date: 0

Media Info

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00230043
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Sep 6 1971 12:00AM