DESIGN OF CONTINUOUSLY REINFORCED CONCRETE PAVEMENT

EXPERIENCE GAINED FROM EXISTING CONTINUOUSLY REINFORCED CONCRETE PAVEMENTS IS NOW ADEQUATE TO SUGGEST CERTAIN DESIGN PRINCIPLES. TRANSVERSE CRACKS AT FREQUENT INTERVALS ARE CAUSED BY DRYING SHRINKAGE, WARPING, WHEEL LOADS, AND FALLING TEMPERATURE. IT IS BELIEVED THAT THE STRESS IN THE STEEL WOULD BE INDEPENDENT OF THE TEMPERATURE DROP IF THE TENSILE STRENGTH OF THE CONCRETE REMAINED CONSTANT. THERE IS EVIDENCE THAT THE STRENGTH OF THE CONCRETE INCREASES CONSIDERABLY AS THE TEMPERATURE FALLS AND THIS INCREASED CONCRETE STRENGTH CAUSES AN INCREASE IN STEEL STRESS. NEITHER THE AMOUNT OF INCREASE IN CONCRETE STRENGTH NOR THE STEEL STRESS OVER A PERIOD OF YEARS IS DEFINITELY KNOWN, BUT EXPERIENCE WITH EXISTING PAVEMENTS, INCLUDING THOSE SUBJECTED TO LOW TEMPERATURES, HAS SHOWN THAT APPROXIMATELY 0.5 PERCENT STEEL WILL NOT BREAK AND THAT THE FREQUENT CRACKS FORMED IN THE CONCRETE WILL BE NARROW ENOUGH IN WIDTH TO RESULT IN MANY YEARS OF SATISFACTORY SERVICE WITH VERY LITTLE MAINTENANCE. /AUTHOR/

Media Info

  • Monograph Title: Continuously reinforced concrete pavement: full-scale and model tests
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00205698
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS, TRB
  • Created Date: Sep 16 1994 12:00AM