BRUSH CONTROL ALONG NATIONAL FORESTS ROADS

IN 1951 AND 1952 THE FOREST SERVICE OF THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCTED TESTS IN ALL REGIONS OF THE CONTINENTAL UNITED STATES AND ALASKA. GENERAL CONCLUSIONS DERIVING FROM THESE TESTS ARE THE FOLLOWING. NUMEROUS REFINEMENTS IN SPRAYING TECHNIQUES HAVE BEEN FOUND TO APPLY NATIONWIDE; OTHERS, SUCH AS OIL IN LIEU OF WATER IN DRY CLIMATES, HAVE LIMITED APPLICATION. THERE APPEARS TO BE SOME ADVANTAGE IN REGULATING THE CONCENTRATION OF SPRAYS SO THAT CHEMICALS WILL BE ABSORBED INTO THE PLANT BEFORE LEAVES ARE KILLED AND DROP OFF. SPRAYING AFTER CUTTING SHOULD BE TIMES FOR WHEN THE SECOND GROWTH IS READY. THIS MAY NOT BE UNTIL SPROUTS ARE EASILY IDENTIFIED AND WELL STARTED. THE EXTENT OF LATE KILL THE YEAR AFTER SPRAYING, LIKE SUBSEQUENT RESPROUTING, ARE UNKNOWN FACTORS. REPETITIVE SPRAYING USUALLY PAYS AS EACH SUCCESSIVE APPLICATION BECOMES MORE EFFECTIVE AND LASTING. ON TRAILS, THE COST OF TRANSPORTATION OF MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT HAS AN IMPORTANT BEARING ON THE FEASIBILITY OF SPRAYING. CAREFUL PLANNING OFTEN KEEPS COSTS FROM BECOMING PROHIBITIVE. ROADSIDE CLEARING ALONG FOREST ROADS USUALLY INVOLVES CONTROL OF YOUNG TREES, AS WELL AS SHRUBS, VINES, HERBACEOUS GROUND COVERS, AND GRASSES. THE OBJECTIVE OF MOWING, CUTTING, OR SPRAYING IS AFETY, ADEQUATE VISIBILITY FOR DRIVING AT LEGAL SPEED, AND MINIMUM FIRE HAZARD ALONG WITH PRESERVATION OF NATURAL ATTRACTIVENESS OF THE LANDSCAPE. /AUTHOR/

  • Supplemental Notes:
    • No 318, pp 37-43
  • Authors:
    • Betts, C A
  • Publication Date: 0

Media Info

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00205076
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Nov 15 1971 12:00AM