Which Reduces Vehicle Travel More: Jobs-Housing Balance or Retail-Housing Mixing?

This paper investigates which land-use strategy yields the greatest reductions in vehicular travel: improving the proximity of jobs to housing, or bringing retail services closer to residential areas. Using data from the San Francisco Bay Area, the degree to which job accessibility is associated with reduced work travel is examined. In addition, the correlation of retail and service accessibility with mile sand hours spent getting to shopping destinations is probed. Findings show that the jobs-housing balance more successfully reduces travel. However, the vehicle miles traveled and vehicle hours traveled reduction elasticities for both polices were estimated to be well above zero, suggesting that pursuing both strategies could yield benefits in many settings. Local and regional initiatives to balance the growth of jobs and housing are discussed.

  • Availability:
  • Authors:
    • Cervero, Robert
    • Duncan, Michael
  • Publication Date: 2006

Language

  • English

Media Info

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 01037728
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS, ATRI
  • Created Date: Nov 30 2006 11:31PM