Empirical Evidence on the Existence of Collateral Anomaly

Two-dimensional microscopic traffic models have been introduced in recent years, opening new lines of research. If properly developed, they may allow more accurate reproduction of traffic behavior, enhancing the effectiveness and application field of traffic simulation. This work analyses a particular behavior of drivers regarding the second dimension of driving (the lateral direction) that the authors call collateral anomaly. It encompasses the peculiar decisions and actions taken by them when two vehicles are right next to each other. In order to achieve that, data extracted from trajectories observed in U. S. highways is used. After the analysis, the authors discuss how these results, as well as others previously reported by different authors, are consistent with the idea of collision avoidance maneuvers executed by drivers due to sudden changes in the trajectories of neighboring vehicles. To verify this behavior on drivers is critical to characterize the way in which vehicles move in the lateral direction. The inclusion of such a behavior into a traffic model might improve the accuracy of traffic modeling, and would help to understand other behaviors observed in the field, which might be related with the lateral movement of vehicles, such as the relaxation phenomenon (Laval and Leclercq, 2008), or the influence of the lane’s and vehicle’s width in traffic (Bartel et al., 1997).

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Media Type: Digital/other
  • Features: Figures; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: 10p
  • Monograph Title: TRB 92nd Annual Meeting Compendium of Papers

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 01478058
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Report/Paper Numbers: 13-4333
  • Files: TRIS, TRB, ATRI
  • Created Date: Feb 5 2013 12:50PM