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Title:

Bicycling Means Business: The Economic Benefits of Bicycle Infrastructure
Cover of Bicycling Means Business: The Economic Benefits of Bicycle Infrastructure

Accession Number:

01458041

Record Type:

Monograph

Abstract:

Bicycling means business. From revitalizing a disinvested avenue in Memphis to pumping money into the economies of small towns along the Great Allegheny Passage, bicycling is breathing economic life into America’s communities. From quantifiable health benefits in Iowa to health insurance cost savings for Bicycle Friendly Business Quality Bicycle Products in Wisconsin, bicycling is boosting America’s economic health. From Portland, where the city built its entire bicycling network for the cost of one mile of urban freeway, to Baltimore, where bicycling projects create twice as many construction jobs per dollar as road projects, cities are discovering that bicycling investments are a cost-effective way to build infrastructure and create jobs. These benefits add up. Every year new studies demonstrate the economic impacts of bicycling – recent examples include Iowa, Minneapolis, Vermont, and Wisconsin. This report highlights the impact the bicycle industry and bicycle tourism can have on state and local economies, discusses the cost effectiveness of investments, points out the benefits of bike facilities for business districts and neighborhoods, and identifies the cost savings associated with a mode shift from car to bicycle. The evidence demonstrates that investments in bicycling infrastructure make good economic sense as a cost-effective way to enhance shopping districts and communities, generate tourism and support business.

Language:

English

Corporate Authors:

League of American Bicyclists

1612 K Street NW, Suite 800
Washington, DC 20006

Alliance for Biking & Walking

P.O. Box 65150
Washington, DC 20035

Authors:

Flusche, Darren

Pagination:

28p

Publication Date:

2012-7

Media Type:

Digital/other

Features:

Figures; Maps; Photos; Tables

Uncontrolled Terms:

Subject Areas:

Economics; Pedestrians and Bicyclists; I10: Economics and Administration

Files:

TRIS

Created Date:

Dec 17 2012 4:09PM