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Title:

Assessing the Full Costs of Congestion on Surface Transportation Systems and Reducing them through Pricing
Cover of Assessing the Full Costs of Congestion on Surface Transportation Systems and Reducing them through Pricing

Accession Number:

01150527

Record Type:

Monograph

Availability:

National Technical Information Service

5301 Shawnee Road
Alexandria, VA 22312 USA
Order Number: PB2010-102773
Order URL: http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB2010102773

Abstract:

The nations transportation network is an essential component of economic growth and prosperity. In particular, roads and highways represent a vital element for automobile and freight truck transportation. Consequently, keeping traffic moving as efficiently as possible is an important contributor to the health of the economy. However, with demand for the existing surface transportation infrastructure exceeding capacity, delays in travel time is only one of the many symptoms of congestion. The effects of congestion are widespread and in addition to delays in travel time, stop-and-go traffic results in increased fuel consumption and to lost productivity and efficiency. It is therefore important to understand the magnitude of the congestion problem and its implications on the national economy as a first step toward identifying possible remedies. In order to allocate the limited roadway capacity among users, congestion pricing is frequently considered an efficient management technique, whereby roadway users are forced to choose between their need to travel and their willingness to pay to travel on certain portions of the road or at certain, high-demand times. While a number of studies have investigated the costs associated with road congestion, most have focused on two main issues, namely increased travel time and added fuel costs. While these two direct costs are understandably significant components, congestion generates a host of other costs that add to the extent of problem. Potential costs of congestion that have received much less attention are those related to increased unreliability, emissions and environmental damage, excess vehicle operating costs, loss of productivity, increased inventory costs as well as higher frequency of cargo delays.

Language:

English

Corporate Authors:

HDR-HLB Decision Economics

Silver Spring, MD USA

Department of Transportation

1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE
Washington, DC 20590 USA

Pagination:

98p

Publication Date:

2009-2

Media Type:

Print

Subject Areas:

Finance; Freight Transportation; Highways; Operations and Traffic Management; I73: Traffic Control

Files:

TRIS, USDOT

Created Date:

Feb 12 2010 10:55AM