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Title:

DESIGN AND INSTALLATION OF LARGE DIAMETER PIPE PILES FOR LAXT WHARF. IN: CURRENT PRACTICES AND FUTURE TRENDS IN DEEP FOUNDATIONS

Accession Number:

00987899

Record Type:

Component

Availability:

American Society of Civil Engineers

1801 Alexander Bell Drive
Reston, VA 20191-4400 USA

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Order URL: http://worldcat.org/isbn/0784407436

Abstract:

A total of 193, 1.37-m (54-in.) diameter and 25-mm (1-in.) wall, open-ended, pipe piles with lengths of 33.5 to 41.5 m (110 to 136 ft.) were used to support the free-standing Los Angeles Export Terminal (LAXT) wharf in up to 22 m (72 ft.) of water in the Port of Los Angeles. These piles were designed for maximum compressive loads of 4.45 MN (1,000 kip). The paper discusses the results of an indicator pile program with Dynamic Pile Driving Analyzer (PDA) measurements, comparisons of the calculated pile capacities with those predicted by PDA measurements, and "set-up" (increase in skin friction) with time. The indicator pile program consisted of driving nine 1.37-m (54-in.) diameter piles with an IHC S-500 hammer and PDA monitoring. For the first three piles, the capacities at the end of initial driving predicting by PDA were about 50% of the design capacities. Alternatives to achieve the design capacity included: use longer piles, wait and re-strike to utilize set-up, and weld shoes at the pile tips to increase the end era. The last option was used and 50- and 100-m (2- and 4-in.) thick shoes were welded to four of the indicator piles. The PDA results for the piles with shoes indicated an increase of 1.3 MN to 2.6 MN (290 to 580 kip) in the pile capacity. A number of indicator piles were retrapped after periods of 1 to 75 days and showed a set-up factor of 1.1 for 1-day to about 2 for 75-day set-up. The degradation of the capacity during driving and subsequent set-up was attributed to slow pore pressure dissipation in the soil plug within the pile. The 193 production piles were successfully driven with the shoes to achieve design capacity resulting in significant savings in cost and time compared to other options. The wharf has been in operation since 1998.

Monograph Accession #:

00987878

Language:

English

Corporate Authors:

American Society of Civil Engineers

Geo Institute, 1801 Alexander Bell Drive
Reston, VA 20191-4400 USA

Authors:

Bhushan, K

Editors:

J A DiMagio
M H Hussein

Pagination:

p. 370-389

Publication Date:

2004

Serial:

ASCE Geotechnical Special Publication

Issue Number: 125
Publisher: American Society of Civil Engineers

ISBN:

0784407436

Features:

Figures (9) ; References (6) ; Tables (2)

Subject Areas:

Bridges and other structures; Design; Highways; Maintenance and Preservation; I24: Design of Bridges and Retaining Walls

Files:

TRIS

Created Date:

Mar 10 2005 12:00AM

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