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Title:

ROAD TRANSPORTATION IN INDIA: MAJOR PROBLEMS AND ISSUES

Accession Number:

00713603

Record Type:

Component

Availability:

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Order URL: http://worldcat.org/isbn/0309061504

Abstract:

Transportation in developing countries is of great significance because of its contribution to national and regional economic, industrial, social, and cultural development. However, most developing countries are facing problems related to traffic and transportation. Inadequate transportation facilities retard the process of socioeconomic development in a country. Especially in a heavily populated country such as India, managing different aspects of transportation is a difficult task. The most important problem concerning highway/transportation professionals in India is that of highway safety. Ministry of Transport figures show that approximately 60,000 people died in road accidents in 1992. The fatality rates are high in many cities in the subcontinent. India has the dubious distinction of accounting for 6% of the world's road deaths while having just 1% of the world's vehicles. There is also a growing concern over the high degree of air pollution in Indian cities. It is evident that most pollution is caused by motor vehicles. The present lead content in gasoline is 0.54 g/L. The government is attempting to lower the lead content to 0.15 g/L, which is nowhere near the world average lead content of 0.013 g/L. The growing trend toward private transportation increases congestion. The way to avoid congestion is to travel by mass transport or railways. India has the third largest rail system in the world after the United States and the former Soviet Union. Despite the efforts of the government, the numbers of accidents and fatalities are increasing year by year, and the environment is becoming more polluted without any strict environmental regulations. Roads are getting congested because more vehicles travel on them. India's government should pass legislation to control vehicles on roads and enforce tougher environmental regulations. With the majority of World Bank funds allocated toward transportation and highways, the government should adopt the latest technology and introduce mass rapid transit to reduce congestion and accidents on roads.

Supplemental Notes:

This paper appears in Transportation Research Record No. 1487, Nonmotorized Transportation Research, Issues, and Use.

Monograph Accession #:

01399783

Language:

English

Authors:

Shaik, Riyaj A

Pagination:

p. 27-34

Publication Date:

1995

Serial:

Transportation Research Record

Issue Number: 1487
Publisher: Transportation Research Board
ISSN: 0361-1981

ISBN:

0309061504

Features:

Figures (4) ; References (5) ; Tables (7)

Uncontrolled Terms:

Geographic Terms:

Old TRIS Terms:

Subject Areas:

Highways; Planning and Forecasting; Public Transportation; I72: Traffic and Transport Planning

Files:

TRIS, TRB

Created Date:

Nov 28 1995 12:00AM

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